Thursday, October 1, 2009

"A Slow Burn" by Mary DeMuth

In Daisy Chain, Daisy Chance had been kidnapped when left alone in an old abandoned church by her friend, Jed. She was 13, he was 14, the best of friends. Jed had blamed himself for her going missing.

In A Slow Burn, Daisy had been missing for two months when Emory, Daisy’s mother, got word that Daisy’s body was found. Following her identification at the morgue and funeral, Emory tried to escape the loneliness and guilt by abusing drugs she got through Angus, wondering if her behaviors throughout Daisy’s childhood could possibly have made her partly responsible for her kidnapping. Only the ‘trips’ mercilessly drug her through the pits of hell and back, taking her through deep, slow, burning torment in the depth of her being, with visions of Daisy and her past. Yet she kept returning again and again to escape.

Hixon, the only black man in Defiance, had a traumatic childhood, unwanted by his mother. Muriel took him in as her ‘adopted son’ and he cared for her throughout her days of cancer. Hixon was told by Muriel that he was to marry Emory, which he also believed was from God. He took on the role of protector of Emory from that day on. Then, on the back doorstep of Daisy’s funeral, Muriel passes away.

It’s during Muriel’s funeral that mysterious things begin to happen. Emory sees a man whom she thinks is Daisy’s killer. Her house is ransacked and Daisy’s picture is stolen. She’s chased home from work one night. Daisy’s second shoe is found sitting on Daisy’s bed. Daisy’s picture is returned. Yet no one could say who this man is or how he gets into Emory’s house.

What I appreciated was how well Mary described the indepth emotions of everyone with such clarity, which included past hurts, bad childhoods, bad attitudes, grieving, hopelessness, and vengeance. Mary captures the essence of feelings so deep. There is only One way out, and Emory needed to find it. Will she? Was she willing? Would the killer get to her before she has a chance?

Other things I liked about Mary’s book that really stood out for me was her poetic word pictures and how she would jump from first person to third person and back all within the span of a page or a chapter. They catch you by surprise and delight! Made you really reason out what was going on!

Purchase here.

M. DeMuth – Bio

Meet the author of A Slow Burn, Mary DeMuth.

mary-demuth-6-iiMary DeMuth
Mary DeMuth is an expert in the field of Pioneer Parenting. She helps Christian parents plow fresh spiritual ground, especially those seeking to break destructive family patterns. Her message guides parents who don’t want to duplicate the home where they were raised or didn’t have positive parenting role models growing up.

An accomplished writer, Mary’s parenting books include Authentic Parenting in a Postmodern Culture, Building the Christian Family You Never Had, and Ordinary Mom, Extraordinary God. Her real-to-life novels inspire people to turn trials into triumphs: Watching the Tree Limbs (2007 Christy Award finalist, ACFW Book of the Year 2nd Place) and Wishing on Dandelions (2007 Retailer’s Choice Award finalist).

Mary is a frequent speaker at womens' retreats and parenting seminars, addressing audiences in both Europe and the United States. National media regularly seek Mary’s candid ability to connect with their listeners. Her radio appearances include FamilyLife Today, Moody Midday Connection, and U.S.A. Radio network. She also has articles published in Marriage Partnership, In Touch, and HomeLife.

As pioneer parents, Mary and her husband Patrick live in Texas with their three children. They recently returned from breaking new spiritual ground in Southern France where they planted a church.

Learn more about Mary at http://marydemuth.com.

A Slow Burn on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0310278376

Mary DeMuth’s Blog: http://relevantblog.blogspot.com

A Slow Burn Book Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQ9c-Cfg3WY

Mary DeMuth’s Facebook Profile: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Mary-DeMuth/33200616570

Follow Mary DeMuth on Twitter: http://twitter.com/mdemuth


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